Thursday, May 29th 3:00 – 6:00
Boston Public Library

CBHM Matters to Many!

CBHM Showcase Celebration at the Boston Public Library was a huge success! Over 150 people, from Boston and beyond, attended the CBHM Showcase Celebration to show their support for CBHM.

John and Susie Trautwein, founders of the Will to Live Foundation.

[soliloquy id="2030"]

 

 

The importance of CBHM was noted by Massachusetts Secretary of Education, Matthew H. Malone. Although he was unable to attend the event, he relayed the following message to attendees:

I’m sorry I couldn’t be with you all today as you gather to discuss the critically important issues surrounding the mental health of our students. Your work is some of the most difficult work happening in American public education today and we don’t say thank you nearly enough. As the Secretary of Education and as a BPS parent, it is inspiring to see this type of collaboration happening for the benefit of our kids. Keep it up. You make us proud.

– Secretary of Education Matthew H. Malone.

Thank you to all of our attendees!

Check out who made it into our photo booth…

[soliloquy id=”1945″]

 

Thank you to our Speakers!

John Trautwein, Will to Live Foundation

John McDonough, Interim Superintendent, Boston Public Schools

Joe Shea, Deputy Superintendent of Operations, Boston Public Schools

Shari Nethersole, M.D., Executive Director & Medical Director, Office of Community Health, Boston Children’s Hospital

Simon Ho, Principal, Boston Public Schools

 

The CBHM Showcase Celebration was presented in partnership with…

Boston Public Schools

Boston Children’s Hospital Neighborhood Partnerships Program

UMass Boston

Screening for Mental Health, Inc.

 

Student services are arranged in “tiers”

“Tier 1 Services” or “Universal Interventions”:

  • Preventative and proactive in nature
  • Delivered to all students across all educational settings.
  • May include school wide initiatives such as reward or token systems to encourage positive behavior, school stores, school mottos and cheers, partnerships with families and community partners, and/or or social skills lessons.
  • It is expected that around 80% of students (if not more) will respond to these services.

“Tier 2 Services” or “Targeted Group Interventions”:

  • For groups of students that do not respond to the first tier of services.
  • Designed to meet the needs of these particular groups, with the expectation that the services will be short-term.
  • May include social skills groups, anxiety groups, anger management groups, boy/girl issues groups, attention/organization skills groups.
  • About 5-10% of the student population needs these services.

“Tier 3 Services” or “Intensive/Individual Interventions”:

  • For individual students that have not responded to both Tier 1 and Tier 2 services.
  • Based on individual assessment of the student, and tailored to the individual student’s unique needs and strengths.
  • May include individual lessons, interventions, or treatment relative to anger, depression, anxiety, etc.
  • Only 1-5% of students are expected to require this level of assistance.

This model of service delivery is meant to be fluid. As a student that receives Tier 2 or Tier 3 services shows that s/he no longer needs them, these progressive services are discontinued.

Reference

 Tilly, W. David (____).  The evolution of school psychology to science-based practice: Problem solving and the Three Tiered Model.  Best Practices in School Psychology V.

“Tier 3 Services” or “Intensive/Individual Interventions”:

  • For individual students that have not responded to both Tier 1 and Tier 2 services.
  • Based on individual assessment of the student, and tailored to the individual student’s unique needs and strengths.
  • May include individual lessons, interventions, or treatment relative to anger, depression, anxiety, etc.
  • Only 1–5% of students are expected to require this level of assistance.

“Tier 2 Services” or “Targeted Group Interventions”:

  • For groups of students that do not respond to the first tier of services.
  • Designed to meet the needs of these particular groups, with the expectation that the services will be short-term.
  • May include social skills groups, anxiety groups, anger management groups, boy/girl issues groups, attention/organization skills groups.
  • About 5–10% of the student population needs these services.

“Tier 1 Services” or “Universal Interventions”:

  • Preventative and proactive in nature
  • Delivered to all students across all educational settings.
  • May include school wide initiatives such as reward or token systems to encourage positive behavior, school stores, school mottos and cheers, partnerships with families and community partners, and/or or social skills lessons.
  • It is expected that around 80% of students (if not more) will respond to these services.
T w i t t e r
F a c e b o o k